Titles are hard

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3 essays due in 12 hours

2 of them have the 1st draft finished but they are shit

Don’t even ask about the third one.

I think I am now going to sleep for 6 hours because being sleep deprived is not going to lead to productivity.

Channel 4 interactive documentary to examine cost of treating NHS patients

kellerprocess:

einhornglitzenkampf:

We’ve actually reached the point where people can ‘vote’ on which patient is most worthy of getting treatment on the NHS.

I legitimately could not get through this article without feeling nauseous, which is rare for me. I cannot believe that this is a thing. Even though the “votes” don’t have any impact on who gets the treatment, that’s hardly the point!

frecklestherobot:

If you run a hate blog, track a hate tag, or otherwise identify yourself by hating something, I am probably not going to like you on principle.

^yup that

unless it’s tories

sofapizza:

retrofuturs:

3D Printing

what a time to be alive.

sofapizza:

retrofuturs:

3D Printing

what a time to be alive.

i wonder if avril lavigne deliberately released the worst video imaginable to get people talking

like everyone said (correctly) that miley’s “we can’t stop” was a terrible video and vma performance but it got people talking. and the song got a lot of attention, and she benefited from the backlash to the backlash.

similarly “blurred lines” became instantly recognisable, frequently played, and parodied and covered, not just in spite of the backlash but because of it.

being a cringeworthy asshole works sometimes.

the slight difference is, while “blurred lines” is disgusting and creepy and rapey, and “we can’t stop” is racist and inappropriate and embarrassing, both of them at least have catchy tunes whereas hello kitty sounds like….a mistake.

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i guess the thing is that 1 physically disabled person could say that "lame" is ableist and should not be used, but 99 could say that it's not, so should you disregard the non-offence of 99 people?

rightnowbb:

I wouldn’t disregard it; I would take all points of view into consideration.

If the question you’re getting at is “How do you, as a privileged person, decide what is or isn’t oppressive on an issue that doesn’t affect you?” I’d say there’s no clear, universal answer on that.

Needless to say, it is okay for a man to tell another man off for saying that a woman owes him sex. It is okay for a straight person to tell another person off for saying that homosexuality is wrong. And it’s okay for an abled person to tell someone that using “special needs” as an insult is ableist.

Those are situations where there’s a very clear right and wrong, based upon the consequences and implications of those remarks. Even if a few members of the oppressed group in question do insist that the remarks are not problematic (due to internalised hatred or just not connecting the dots or whatever), they objectively do harm and most campaigners for those groups recognise that.

On the other hand, where there are grey areas in which the consequences of the remarks are not clear and the issue is still being debated within the affected group, that’s a lot more complicated. Whether it’s okay for a non-affected person to weigh in or not is highly dependent on individual circumstances.

I don’t feel comfortable saying with certainty that “l-me” is ableist or not. I’m not part of the group that would be affected by that word; nor have I really read enough discourse around it to form an impression of the consensus. I find many of the arguments that the overfocus on perfect language within anti-ableism creates an accessibility problem, to be quite convincing. But it’s also not up to me to declare “this word is not offensive at all!” when it’s not an word that would affect me anyway. So in that case, I abstain from comment.

I feel like the C word just fits more comfortably into that first group—i.e. not such a grey area. Just as I’m sure that the N word is racist despite not being black, and I’m sure it’s transmisogynist to misgender a trans woman despite not being trans, I’m sure that c**v is classist despite not being underclass—based on observing the intent behind the word and the consequences of the archetype. But of course, I’m open to discussing it.

I’m also open to criticism if anybody thinks I’m wrong about anything I’ve asserted here: I’m not certain about any of this, but I know we all have to make these judgments sometimes and this is just my attempt at figuring out roughly how we do that.

I do like this new trend of people asking me interesting questions :)

i guess the thing is that 1 physically disabled person could say that "lame" is ableist and should not be used, but 99 could say that it's not, so should you disregard the non-offence of 99 people?

I wouldn’t disregard it; I would take all points of view into consideration.

drsofialamb:

*in the confessional* father, I love avril lavigne’s song actually

question: is there a circle of hell reserved for people with terrible taste, and if so, is it full of things that are awesome?